Defending companies at election time

Euskadi needs to progress in its model of sustainable social cohesion. Election programmes must take a long-term view of the future, and in Euskadi, industry is the path to achieving that cohesion.

Election time is a good moment to stop and to think about relevant social, economic and political matters. Despite the media whirlwind of proposals, assessments of the past legislature, and what has, or has not been achieved, along with social demands, etc., it is crucial to stay focused on the relevant issues in the business world as elements of stimulating society. Euskadi needs to progress in its model of sustainable social cohesion. Indeed, social balance has been battered by the deep and prolonged economic crisis we have been traversing, despite public policies being rolled out to keep the welfare state ticking over. Future public policies need to be designed so as to ensure the relatively favourable position we enjoy in Europe in terms of social equality; this is what the central focus of Government action must be.

Consequently, we must stand and fight against the unsustainably high rates of unemployment being suffered by so many around us. A significant number of our youth cannot access real entry-level jobs which will lead to their own personal development, and there is uncertainty regarding the direction which the new post-crisis scenario will take. To that end, we must reiterate the absolute necessity to develop policies which favour wealth creation, which in my opinion, is the best instrument of social policy, along with achieving a heightened level of social justice. Our country must maintain an attitude of ongoing commitment to industry as a motor of our competitiveness.

Therefore, we need to make the social value of the company the central axis of wealth creation by means of actively educating society to overcome the stigmatisation companies have suffered. We must collectively strive to enhance their social value and create a milieu which is supportive of both ongoing improvement, and that of the capacities of the Basque industrial ecosystem, to later make a drive for internationalisation, to name but one goal.

Unfortunately though, we are still incapable of visualising what the competitive setting of the future could look like. What is clear, however, is that Basque companies will need to muster all the human potential at their disposal to create new and shared management models to increase value added in their business activities while continuing to develop their capacities. Aside from adapting these new management models to the specific needs of groups of clients, they would also have an international focus, and be closely linked to the society in which they operate.

Election programmes must take a long-term view of the future, and in Euskadi, industry is the path to achieving that cohesion.

Read the original article in elEconomista.es (Spanish)

Sabin Azua

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